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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to add the CCP2 to my 2020 transit as a way to connect a 55A load.

Is there a kit number to buy the CCP2 components and add on after purchase? I saw the order kit KU5T-14D089-B, but this doesn't come up in any searches and I have called multiple Ford dealers and no service/ parts departments can find this number, no know what the CCPs are.

I don't want to use the CCP1 with the 60A low profile PAL fuse to avoid nuisance blows since this fuse is so hard to access. Ideally I would just put an 80A fuse in this CCP1 slot, but I haven't been able to find a jumper/ other solution that could work and this style fuse only goes up to 60A from what I can find.

Part numbers for the CCP2 kit or suggestions for how to manage the CCP1 fuse slot for a 75-80A fuse are appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I actually shared this exact image to 2 Ford parts counters and emailed this image to a third dealer for help. The kit number doesn't come up in their system, a request for support to Ford was submitted by one dealer, but that was over a week ago with out any response.


Show a parts counter this page from the 2020 BEMM:
View attachment 146137
[/QUOTE]

Show a parts counter this page from the 2020 BEMM:
View attachment 146137
[/QUOTE]
 

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That part number comes up as a relay. Would not surprise me if BEMM is wrong.

If you find a dealer with knowledgeable parts dept. please let me know.
I am trying to retrofit the FPBG. There are 3 pages in the BEMM on it but no part number.
Can anyone help on this one?
 

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I fail to understand the desire to have a factory system when a Automatic Charge Relay does the same thing, The factory system is an ACR for all intents and purposes. Just buy a Acr and be done with it.

 

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That part number comes up as a relay. Would not surprise me if BEMM is wrong.
I couldn't find it by that number either, and agree the BEMM must not be accurate.
The right parts guy would use their resources to discover what need to be done to find it.
Hopefully the dealer @cfinn mentioned will come up with an answer from Ford.
 

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I didn't realize that the CCP2 was even an option.

All of the Transits that I have seen have it.
 

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Interesting. Literally every one of them that I have worked on was a single alternator / single battery version and it had a CCP2.

Either way, it seems like something that is pretty easily built up from parts without needing the Ford kit if you can't obtain it any other way.

Obviously if you can buy something off the shelf that is almost always easier.
 

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Interesting. Literally every one of them that I have worked on was a single alternator / single battery version and it had a CCP2.

Either way, it seems like something that is pretty easily built up from parts without needing the Ford kit if you can't obtain it any other way.

Obviously if you can buy something off the shelf that is almost always easier.
Yep -- our 2020 single alternator with single battery has ccp2...we didn't order the kit. The BEMM is useful but is far from entirely accurate.
 

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I fail to understand the desire to have a factory system when a Automatic Charge Relay does the same thing, The factory system is an ACR for all intents and purposes. Just buy a Acr and be done with it.

Adding CCP2 gets you 175A connection vs 60a for CCP1. So it is similar to adding 2 CCP's in the pre 2020 low spec Transits that only came with one. The built in "load shedding" is a bonus.
It seems that FPBG is needed to implement SEIC in 2020, unlike previous years. SEIC is necessary for enhanced alternator cooling for idle charging. If you could point me to the documentation for how to do this on a gas engine 2020 without the FPBG, that would be great.
 

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Interesting. Literally every one of them that I have worked on was a single alternator / single battery version and it had a CCP2.
Yep -- our 2020 single alternator with single battery has ccp2...we didn't order the kit.
Apparently "certain SVO options" is a broad category! 😁
 

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Adding CCP2 gets you 175A connection vs 60a for CCP1. So it is similar to adding 2 CCP's in the pre 2020 low spec Transits that only came with one. The built in "load shedding" is a bonus.
It seems that FPBG is needed to implement SEIC in 2020, unlike previous years. SEIC is necessary for enhanced alternator cooling for idle charging. If you could point me to the documentation for how to do this on a gas engine 2020 without the FPBG, that would be great.
You can buy ACRs up to 500 amps, load shedding is just another name for low voltage lockout, Other people in the past have pointed out that the idle increases with alternator load on its own. Seic rpm is far above idle rpm
No one here used Seic until the last year or so, and no one here got the Fpbg option until a year ago.
 

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Apparently "certain SVO options" is a broad category! 😁
:ROFLMAO: -- I think you're right asdrew -- although I think "certain" can be replaced with "almost any." :) Our 2020 has no upfitters, no aux fuse box, no rear heat/ac, nothing electrically from bare bones but for power heated mirrors...and 10 way power heated seats...and I guess basic cruise would be on that list too :) That was somehow enough for CCP2...which I was pleasantly pleased to discover (so I'm not whining.) Cheers.
 
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You can buy ACRs up to 500 amps, load shedding is just another name for low voltage lockout, Other people in the past have pointed out that the idle increases with alternator load on its own. Seic rpm is far above idle rpm
No one here used Seic until the last year or so, and no one here got the Fpbg option until a year ago.
I am not debating that load shedding is probably just an ACR. Point was benefit adding CCP2 is a 175A circuit (all be it limited by a time constraint. The Ford system also time limits engine off power, which may be helpful or may an obstacle to overcome depending on use scenario and preference.

As to the benefit of SEAC. If the vehicle automatically increases the idle to support alternator loading as you say and it is only to the level needed to support the loads, that could actually be more detrimental to the alternator life. The objective of using the SEIC is to increase alternator speed beyond what is required for the load so then the fan speed relative to load is increased beyond the linear ratio (see alternator output graph)

The native vehicle idle speed increase certainly cant adjust based on how long that load will be present. Others have confirmed elsewhere on this site that the the alternator is not temperature regulated. In fact as the alternator gets hotter due to high loads the idle might then increase further with such a control. Hopefully this is limited to avoid a a death spiral. I'd assume (hope) the increase would be limited to avoid this. So then of course so would the output as the alternator heats up and eventually the vehicle voltage would drop to the point that the CCP (or ACR) would cut the load.

I would like to be able to pull 60A in addition to the vehicle load while idling for say 30min without frying the alternator. If that works, I might try to push that to 100A. It would be nice to put a day's juice back into the house battery in 30 min of high idle. I'd be surprised if the vehicle could safely support that natively. What other type of scenario could Ford have created the SEIC feature for.

I realize this has not been done by many in the past for camper van house charging, but what does that mean? There are also a few who have done this with pre 2020 vehicles and have posted about the positive benefits.

The fact that Ford provides a 60A unregulated connection point, leads me to believe that the vehicle can support that load safely within their testing parameters (including idle?). Anything beyond that requires additional considerations, born out by their time qualifying statements for such loads. I personally would not even want to rely on pushing the 60A connection to it's limit.
 

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:ROFLMAO: -- I think you're right asdrew -- although I think "certain" can be replaced with "almost any." :) Our 2020 has no upfitters, no aux fuse box, no rear heat/ac, nothing electrically from bare bones but for power heated mirrors...and 10 way power heated seats...and I guess basic cruise would be on that list too :) That was somehow enough for CCP2...which I was pleasantly pleased to discover (so I'm not whining.) Cheers.
Or it just depends what parts may or may not happen to have available at that station on the assembly line as the vehicle whizzes by . Quality is Job #1. :oops:
 

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Or it just depends what parts may or may not happen to have available at that station on the assembly line as the vehicle whizzes by . Quality is Job #1. :oops:
Imagine that you are a Ford Transit product manager. On one side are the accountants and amazon telling you to save a nickel on every van by stripping off everything that isn't absolutely required.

You put vans out to the dealers and customers refuse to buy them (missing your sales / margin goals) because of a missing feature or a size too small of alternator. (180 vs 220 vs 250 vs dual 250s, etc)

Eventually you just call both the 220 and 250 version "HD / heavy duty" and avoid the details.

If you can use the same alternator that is being used on the F150 factory next door and the suppliers can ramp up to meet the need, it can make a lot of sense to use the same parts. Same with the CCP aspect.

It is surprisingly complex to run a production line that includes customization.
 

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Imagine that you are a Ford Transit product manager. On one side are the accountants and amazon telling you to save a nickel on every van by stripping off everything that isn't absolutely required.

You put vans out to the dealers and customers refuse to buy them because of a missing feature or a size too small of alternator. (180 vs 220 vs 250 vs dual 250s, etc)

Eventually you just call both the 220 and 250 version "HD / heavy duty" and avoid the details.

If you can use the same alternator that is being used on the F150 factory next door and the suppliers can ramp up to meet the need, it can make a lot of sense to use the same parts.

It is suprisingly complex to run a production line that includes customization.
After a 36 year career in manufacturing management (including positions in engineering, production, production planning, purchasing, and some time in quality assurance ) I understand the constraints and pressures quite well. While my comment was (an apparently an unsuccessful) attempt at humor, there is unfortunately a great deal of truth in the statement as well. Many of the quality problems that have been identified on this site have nothing to do with product design issues. They are plain and simple due to a lack of or failure to adhere to rigorous process controls. . For example, in the most extreme case, how else could differentials with mismatched gear ratios make it into an AWD vehicle. The problem could very well go back to the supplier, but that is still Ford's responsibility to ensure reliability. There are also problems that are flat out bad design. And yes there are also many intentional design decisions that are in fact driven by the (valid and sometimes not valid) pressures you cited.
 
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