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Discussion Starter #1
Mostly it's a home away from home on wheels with modular accoutrements and a "knockoff interior" (because there are so many things that can get knocked off) ...

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Click to enlarge pictures.

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  1. rear left side view

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  2. rear right side view

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  3. looking back

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  4. the bench (aka: Queequeg's Coffin ~ re: Moby Dick)

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  5. used the inverter to run the charger on one of the AGM batteries (small wood box to right in previous picture)

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  6. One more of the back from this morning's shakedown cruse
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There is still a good bit to be done, but it did alright on it's first outing. Although - that mini ceiling fan can remove body parts if you're not careful. ;-]

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Very Impressive...........

Definitely a not your follow the crowd build. Very Impressive and I like it. I'd of done it with a MR model but I like your style.

Van Safe,
VA
 

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Looks very nice!

That ceiling fan... uh-uh. It's going to get you, sooner or later. It's going to hurt.

I'm using a Caframo marine cabin fan as an all-purpose interior fan -- in addition to having a vent fan. Have been using it a lot blowing down, over my shoulder, while sitting in a chair.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just think what can be done with a high roof.

Walk under the ceiling fan while it's spinning? ;-] There is soooo much space that has potential in these transits. I just couldn't cover over the "window wells", so I put them to use.

 

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Interesting and Different

I like your fan box over the rear doors, did that do anything to the noise level of the fan? You enjoy photography.....are any of the pictures inside your photos?, they all seem to be paintings. Can't figure the sprayer, maybe to rinse off the bike? I have a lot of questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
behavioral modification of the ambient thermal zone

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  • fan box / noise level
  • the pictures
  • sprayer
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  • Re: the details The box did help reduce the noise. I added "blastgates" ( [ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000223YS[/ame] ) to be able to close off access underneath and DPDT switches ( [ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GUDKB0[/ame] ) to be able to reverse the fan motors. Being able to just bend over to open or close the blastgates is a walk around proposition and keeping the one closed on the passenger side is a must while driving (shorty exhaust pipe). They they can be switched on from the driver's seat and work pretty good at blowing the heat out before cranking up the AC, but ... To be honest , I think that particular outside access route has more merit as a source for passive airflow similar to what orton does and getting through to the rear underside for things like electrical connections. Insulating the roof and walls was the key to dealing with heat from the sun overhead along with a passive route to vent the "pressure cooker" effect. . Direct airflow like EddieZ uses works better to combat perspiration.
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  • The paintings were done by family members. The two behind the driver's seat were done from pictures taken out on the Waccasassa Bay and St. John's River.
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  • The sprayer is a convenient way to store and dispense three gallons of "potable water".
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location for the blowers


switches behind driver's seat


reflectix behind the panels

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Edit: fixed the
 

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Nice build out! How did you fasten your panels to the frame/ sheet metal? Did you use existing factory holes? How or what did you thread the screws into
?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
trying to "get lucky"

On the slider I re-used the plastic push retainers. I used the slider panel as a pattern and used the factory holes. I knew that wasn't an option for the window wells and roof. I didn't want to glue anything to the metal, so that's where the "screw up" began. For most of the panels, I cheated. I held them up, drilled a 3/16" pilot hole and then drove in a SS sheet metal screw with a cup washer. The self-drilling point on the SS sheet metal screws really helped. I picked areas with no wiring and over an inch clearance to drill. It's like tapping on a wall to find a stud and then trying to "get lucky" as far as not ending up on top of some factory hole. I did take a lot of pictures beforehand and used them as a rough guide for where to drill. The 4 x 8 panel on the roof was held up with two tripods to get started. If this setup passes the prototype phase. I'll drill out the screw holes and insert 8-32 Rivet Nuts and use SS machine screws with the same cup washers.

I will admit to wanting to something functional with all that space between the cargo panels and the outside metal - tilt out drawers for seldom used items, etc ... [-; like - IDK - maybe a dry engine air filter ;-]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0040CYWX0[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NHS9US[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HYLZZMQ[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008VGVH5C[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HYM01KG[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008VGVI2Y[/ame]
 

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Interesting solution the ribbed rivet nuts.....so what drill bit size is needed to create the hole to receive the rivet nut?
And I assume you pound the rivet in and it's held by friction alone?
Are they sufficient for the pullout forces from gravity, weight and dynamic forces of moving vehicle, etc? Simple, elegant solution. I like it.
 

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Each rivnut has a specific size hole that is required for proper use. You just need to make sure you have the proper size drill bit if the holes are not the correct size for the rivnut that you are placing.
 

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thanks ultane. That makes sense. How does one determine the correct bit size based on the nomenclature of the specifications of the rivet.....?

for example Shadetreemech posted a link to Amazon for this:

Ribbed "K" Series Rivet Nuts - Material: Steel-Yellow Zinc, Thread Size: 8-32 UNC, Grip Range: .080-.130, 100 Piece Box

which of these numbers determines the correct drill bit size? (.080-.130? is this millimeters?) how does that translate to bit size? why is it a range? seems like the tolerance would have to be pretty exact in order for it to work.

anyone with satisfactory results with these fasteners? I think Orton used a similar device to fix his rear handles?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
looks like you're on the right track

Think along the lines of a pop rivit that has threads on the inside. The ones I'm using are the cheaper cousins to the ones mentioned in the http://www.fordtransitusaforum.com/camper-vans-conversions/8217-source-riv-nut-tool.html post. Looks like and can be used like this ...


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Hole sizes and holding strength vary according to the rivet / plus nut you're working with and install tools also vary. If you dig through the Amazon replys or post a question you can usually get detail like you're looking for.

Sorry for the late reply, I got side tracked this morning.

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thanks ultane. That makes sense. How does one determine the correct bit size based on the nomenclature of the specifications of the rivet.....?

for example Shadetreemech posted a link to Amazon for this:

Ribbed "K" Series Rivet Nuts - Material: Steel-Yellow Zinc, Thread Size: 8-32 UNC, Grip Range: .080-.130, 100 Piece Box

which of these numbers determines the correct drill bit size? (.080-.130? is this millimeters?) how does that translate to bit size? why is it a range? seems like the tolerance would have to be pretty exact in order for it to work.

anyone with satisfactory results with these fasteners? I think Orton used a similar device to fix his rear handles?

lepelch,

It's my understanding that 'Range' refers to the range of thicknesses (mm) of sheet metal that a specific rivnut is suitable to be used. It's also my understanding that the insertion tool has different size mandrels that screws into the different size rivnuts, and then the tool pulls the mandrel with a considerable amount of force, causing the rivnut to 'bulge' behind the sheet metal, holding the rivnut in place. The portion of the rivnut that bulges has no threads, so the mandrel is easy to unscrew. I assume that the larger the bulge and harder the rivnut metal, the more of a load each rivnut can hold before pulling out of the sheet metal. The ribbed rivnuts are a little bit more resistant to spinning, after installation, when a screw is being tightened down to hold something in place.

I bought my rivnut tool at the local 'TACOMA SCREW' store in Boise before moving east. I asked the salesman at the desk which size bit that each of the rivnuts a required when I stocked up before moving. I assume that you can ask any Amazon vendor that is selling them, which size drill bit is required for each size rivnut. One of the rivnuts took a weird size bit, but I can't recall which one it was.

Someone here probably knows which size rivnuts will fit into the various holes located underneath the black sheeting in the cargo van. It has also been suggested to use a strong magnet along the sheet metal to capture the metal filings as the fall inside the metal posts, and then maneuver the magnet to a hole to acquire the metal shavings so that they don't rust inside the hidden recesses of the van.


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Hi Ultane:
Thanks for the explanation on how the system works. The tool is the crux. I looked up a Youtube video and it has now become clear how it all works.
Thanks again!
Patrick
 
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