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2020 RWD 250 148" HR
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all!

I am using the panel in the pic below (this is the explorist.life 12v panel he uses). These have a #10 lug but the plastic spacing is too narrow to fit a 8 awg #10 ring terminal end. I would prefer to not have bare 8awg wire in the panel as I don't feel it will secure to my liking (stranded...).

I have seen recommendations for just reducing to 10v with a buttsplice reducer and then using the 10awg #10 rings which fit the lugs but this does not seem safe to me. The 8awg wiring is for a long run that is per the awg chart for a high amp 12v aux receptacle. I am being on the safe side on that circuit due to my concerns of voltage drop/ampacity in the 12v system. Seems to me that reducing the wire gauge at the panel just so I can use the smaller ring terminals that fit will create a safety issue for wire cook off.

"Removing a few wires of the 8awg and using the 10awg ring terminal" also sounds risky...

Also, some of the recommendations to just "trim the 8 awg ring terminal" are a no go...

Can I get a sanity check here? Anyone else run into this situation with 8awg and this panel? Maybe like an 8 awg ferule or something like that could be used... that works on the ground side as it is a compression lug. But the positive lug is a screw lug for a fork or ring end...

I may just resort to bare 8awg in the panel... on the lug screw.

I am stuck trying
Hand Circuit component Finger Gadget Communication Device


the above is the 8awg #10 ring and it does not fit.

The below is a 10awg FORK and it does not fit.
Finger Gadget Communication Device Gesture Computer hardware
 

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Hello all!

I am using the panel in the pic below (this is the explorist.life 12v panel he uses). These have a #10 lug but the plastic spacing is too narrow to fit a 8 awg #10 ring terminal end. I would prefer to not have bare 8awg wire in the panel as I don't feel it will secure to my liking (stranded...).

I have seen recommendations for just reducing to 10v with a buttsplice reducer and then using the 10awg #10 rings which fit the lugs but this does not seem safe to me. The 8awg wiring is for a long run that is per the awg chart for a high amp 12v aux receptacle. I am being on the safe side on that circuit due to my concerns of voltage drop/ampacity in the 12v system. Seems to me that reducing the wire gauge at the panel just so I can use the smaller ring terminals that fit will create a safety issue for wire cook off.

"Removing a few wires of the 8awg and using the 10awg ring terminal" also sounds risky...

Also, some of the recommendations to just "trim the 8 awg ring terminal" are a no go...

Can I get a sanity check here? Anyone else run into this situation with 8awg and this panel? Maybe like an 8 awg ferule or something like that could be used...

I may just resort to bare 8awg in the panel... on the lug screw.

I am stuck trying View attachment 181716
Why is this a "no go"?
It is really the best solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's the wrong type of connector for those; you need a fork terminal. That might help reframe your issue. (if the fork terminal is narrower for that gauge)
The 8 awg and 10awg forks do not fit. Only 12-14awg... That's why the ring
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why is this a "no go"?
It is really the best solution.
Well... that's why I am posting eh? haha... 10awg connectors are called that because they are not rated for 8awg... ? right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you tried differently shaped connectors? For the pitchfork shape might fit.
he 8 awg and 10awg forks do not fit. Only 12-14awg... That's why the ring
 

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Probably get cited for some sort of reckless endangerment... but I've snipped the sides off of rings that were too wide like that. I figure I'm maximizing the surface area of contact and it's more secure than the fork. Just used stout wire snips.
 

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I have handled this sort of thing in a few different ways, just depending on the specifics.

1) Carefully clip some strands from the wire to make it fit into a smaller crimp (making sure not to have straggler ends). My reasoning goes like this:

a) Normally (at least in my 12-volt life) this is done on a wire that has more than enough ampacity for the job, and is larger only because I'm trying to have minimum voltage drop. e.g. 14-gauge would do the job ampacity-wise, but I'm using 8AWG for voltage drop reasons.

b) The part of the crimp connector that crimps around the now-slightly-smaller wire is itself made of tinned copper, so in a way it's like adding wire back. Of course don't take this to extremes where you have just a few strands left that are going to be prone to breaking at the joint.

c) This assumes quality crimps and crimpers, and self-adhesive heat shrink over the end(s) of the metal part of the crimp.

2) File a bit off the sides of the ring terminal to make it slightly more oval.

a) This assumes you are using a nice chunky ring terminal as you show, not some super thin one to start with.

3) Or potentially use a captured fork, if that fits better.
 

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Well... that's why I am posting eh? haha... 10awg connectors are called that because they are not rated for 8awg... ? right?
Remove enough strands from the 8 awg so that the diameter is the same as the 10 awg and then crimp the 10 awg as you normally would, using only ratcheting crimpers, and performing a gentle tug test when complete.

I can't tell from your picture, but it might also be possible to trim the 8 awg connector with metal snips (or a file) just enough so that it fits. If you go that route, try to start with a connector whose center hole matches the diameter of the screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Remove enough strands from the 8 awg so that the diameter is the same as the 10 awg and then crimp the 10 awg as you normally would, using only ratcheting crimpers, and performing a gentle tug test when complete.
Honestly, thinking more about this approach as I think about it. Thanks for the input!

This would really just remove the concept of adding smaller wire to the 8awg wire just to use a connector that fits. The terminal end is just brass... so trimming the 8awg to fit that end connector would not be risking adding smaller wire... I think I am going this route
 
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If you cannot find anything available to purchase, maybe you can make something. Anything you make yourself wouldn’t meet any codes or standards. I would look for some copper flat bar and make an adapter if you have room for it in the panel. It could be bent to 90 degree if needed for restricted space to a side connection? See sketch. I have no idea of the space you have to make this connection. You could add a distribution terminal block nearby that will take 8 gauge wire, connect it to the panel with a short piece of 10 gauge. A split bolt connecting a few inches of 10 gauge to the long run of 8 gauge would work if you insulate it well. Bolt two ring lugs together, one 10 gauge to one 8 gauge? If you connect 10 gauge to 8 gauge keep the 10 gauge as short as reasonably possible. I have used reducing ferrules before for a situation like this. Just be sure anything you use is rated and insulated for the voltage and amperage of the circuit you put it into. Make sure it is insulated very well if you make it yourself. When ever I do something like this, I try to over build it. If I need 20 amps, I will try to build it to handle 40 amps. If three wraps of tape are required for the applied voltage, I will use six. This is to add a safety factor into it. Whatever you do get someone that really knows electrical work to look it over before you apply any power to it. My choice would be a solid copper bar cut and drilled to fit the panel where you connect to it. But I don’t know the space you have to do this in. The picture is some stuff I had in my garage to give you an idea of what I mean.
 

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