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Because the 100Ah and the 206Ah have the same 100A discharge rate. With my two 100Ah batteries, I have 200A max discharge rate. With his one 206 Ah battery, OP has a max discharge rate of 100A.
 

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Because the 100Ah and the 206Ah have the same 100A discharge rate. With my two 100Ah batteries, I have 200A max discharge rate. With his one 206 Ah battery, OP has a max discharge rate of 100A.
Interesting observation. I'd assume that's a limit in their BMS - or they did a copy/paste when they shouldn't. But in the 100Ah, they're "approved" for 1.0C discharge - which ain't low. I'd certainly prefer to keep my draw in the 0.5C if I could.

Another interesting observation: SOK's 24V unit (out of stock / "sold out") is also 50/100A - but on 24V, so double the power - but it lends toward the "we use the same BMS on all units" possibility. 🤔
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Interesting observation. I'd assume that's a limit in their BMS - or they did a copy/paste when they shouldn't. But in the 100Ah, they're "approved" for 1.0C discharge - which ain't low. I'd certainly prefer to keep my draw in the 0.5C if I could.

Another interesting observation: SOK's 24V unit (out of stock / "sold out") is also 50/100A - but on 24V, so double the power - but it lends toward the "we use the same BMS on all units" possibility. 🤔
With that being said, would you disagree with the assumption that having 2 100ah batteries would give me a greater current output to support an inverter, compared to the single 206ah battery?
 

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With that being said, would you disagree with the assumption that having 2 100ah batteries would give me a greater current output to support an inverter, compared to the single 206ah battery?
Yes. But only if your max charging capacity would be more than 50A @ 12V. Which the van can do on the alternator - and seems a shame to limit. So, yeah. I would do 2 batteries for this reason alone.

But I'm in the "moar powah" gang, so... I've got 2 @ the equivalent of 340A each (2 x 170A @ 24V). 🤷‍♀️
 

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In all battery types, there are trade offs of capacity and ability to deliver amps continuously vs intermittently.

In the case of all LiFe batteries, one of the throttle points is the BMS. The higher the capacity of the BMS, the more volume it occupies and the higher the cost.

Relatively few internal BMS units on the market commercially can sustain 100 amps and many are really 50 or 75 amp rated. As you run them near the max rating, they get hot and burn up capacity and sometimes quite a bit. The typical internal BMS is buried deep inside of plastic, so there isn't a good thermal path for this heat to escape. They can also fail, especially if there is a surge that takes the power up near the limits, even well within the published limits of brand name batteries. (guess how I know)
There are BMS's that don't have this limitation. This is one of many reasons why I went with the Electrodacus SBMS0. It has a very active community and the designer/owner is a great guy.

 

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The typical internal BMS is buried deep inside of plastic, so there isn't a good thermal path for this heat to escape. They can also fail, especially if there is a surge that takes the power up near the limits, even well within the published limits of brand name batteries. (guess how I know)
This is one of the reasons I thought the SOK was an attractive choice. steel case, large heat sink on BMS, internals are serviceable. Already popped mine open. Quality of assembly looked quite good. Unfortunately no UART port on the BMS for a Bluetooth connection to monitor individual cells, but at least I can periodically check them manually to make sure they are in balance. Does anyone know of a standalone 4S Bluetooth voltage monitor that does not need to connect through the BMS?
158569
 

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I am a big fan of the bogart Trimetic + WiFi module
Thanks. I still have not decided on a battery monitor.

I was actually looking for something that monitors the individual cells in each of my 4S batteries that will be wired in parallel. Many BMSs have UART ports available to plug in Bluetooth modules that provide the voltage readings from the balance leads , but the BMSs on my batteries don't have that port, so I was looking for stand alone solution. The display would look like this. It would be handy, to occasionally open up the display on a phone to check the voltages on all 12 cells are still in balance. I did find a cheap Chinese hard wired device for 8 cells, so I could get the info with 2 of them but it would require scrolling through the screens on 2 physical displays. More problematic is that the documentation is not clear if the device has a balancing function, which I would not want to have parallel with the BMS that is already providing that functionality.
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Point of reference: We recently installed two of the SOK 100Ah batteries. Each has the same 100A discharge rate as your 206Ah battery. Our largest draw is the microwave at 1,100W, which plays nicely with our Xantrex ProWatt 1800W inverter.

Recently, SOK communicated directly to a friend that the 100A discharge rate is conservative, but I see no advantage in pushing it.

Too late for you, since you have purchased your battery, but it appears to be wiser to purchase two 100Ah than one 206Ah unless you are building a larger system.
I was able to get the 2 100ah batteries, thanks for the headsup!
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Charging from the alternator is a great way to go. You'll need a DC-DC charger - the voltage on the van isn't high enough to charge LFP batteries and it must be delivered at the correct voltage. Plenty of options there. Victron's OrionTR Smart units max at 30A; I wouldn't go that route with an alternator that will easily provide 3-4 times that with the right charger - doesn't seem right for ~$250 to me. You can get as large as 120A from Sterling; but that's borderline too large for a single 200Ah battery - ~$400-500 for 60A. Renogy maxes at 60A; but at least that's ~$220.

CCP2 is a "protected" battery/alternator connection in the 2020+ Transits. It's fused at 175A - so that's your limit using it. It is shut off by the van when the van isn't running and if the van determines that it can't or won't run correctly with it on ("load shedding"). Unless you're pulling over ~170A from the van, that's the connector to use for DC-DC charging.
Turns out I only have CCP1, not CCP2. Is there a straightforward answer on what my best options are now for B2B charging?
 

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Turns out I only have CCP1, not CCP2. Is there a straightforward answer on what my best options are now for B2B charging?
Your B2B options have not really changed other than if you wanted to charge at higher amperage than CCP1 can support. Since the recommended/max charge rate for your SOK battery is 40a/50a the CCP limit is a non issue. The vehicle voltage protection that CCP2 provides would be redundant with that provided by the B2B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Your B2B options have not really changed other than if you wanted to charge at higher amperage than CCP1 can support. Since the recommended/max charge rate for your SOK battery is 40a/50a the CCP limit is a non issue. The vehicle voltage protection that CCP2 provides would be redundant with that provided by the B2B.
I did however switch to two of the 100ah SOK batteries. So my hope would be to capitalize on higher amperage charging. I was thinking a 60a Sterling B2B charger, which I wouldn’t want to run off CCP1. So I guess I have 2 questions.
1. what’s the highest amp charger you recommend with CCP 1? I saw someone do a 40a with a 50a fuse in between which seems smart.
2. If I went the higher amp charging route, how would you recommend doing so? Combine CCPs? Straight to battery?
 

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To play it safe, might be best with 50A breaker on CCP1. But, technically, you could go 60A - you'd just risk hitting the fuse if the B2B pulled too much.

Or go directly to the battery. Pretty sure the single alternator in a 2020 is 250A, so you've got plenty of power available. And the high-power mode is documented in the BEMM - theoretically up to 200A but supposedly up to 120A continuous. Just add a vehicle-run signal to shut off the DC-DC when engine isn't running.
 

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I did however switch to two of the 100ah SOK batteries. So my hope would be to capitalize on higher amperage charging. I was thinking a 60a Sterling B2B charger, which I wouldn’t want to run off CCP1. So I guess I have 2 questions.
1. what’s the highest amp charger you recommend with CCP 1? I saw someone do a 40a with a 50a fuse in between which seems smart.
2. If I went the higher amp charging route, how would you recommend doing so? Combine CCPs? Straight to battery?
1 - sounds good. I believe the B2B may be rated base on output. So when boosting the voltage, like for LiFPO4 it would pull more than 40 amps (unless the output gets reduced) 🤷‍♀️
2 - no CCP's to combine with single CCP in 2020+. That was older config. You'd need to either upgrade to the 2CCP set up. Good luck finding the part numbers. There is a post from someone that did that, but IIRC they had an Ford engineering (?) contact that hooked them up with the parts. The BEMM describes the procedure for hooking up directly to the battery. It is imperative to connect using a relay with the vehicle load shedding signal (like is built into the CCPs) to protect the vehicle voltage when operating. Pull too much and the vehicle won't be happy, such as mission critical computers and electric power steering.

If it was me I'd probably start with the 40A Renogy and see if that's enough depending on your consumption/generation patterns given that you also have solar panels.

The second battery gives you a lot of float to level out average consumption with average charge over longer periods. I've got 3 x 206ah batteries in my plans for just that reason. Since I won't have solar (plan to park in shade when possible). My estimate is that 3 batteries will allow me to meet my power needs by averaging 6 hrs of driving *70a est charge rate) over every 3 or 4 day period. That should match my travel patterns. In the rare cases that balance is not met, some idle charging is the backup.
 
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