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So my 2021 gas transit custom order was moved to 2022 last year. Now, dear Ford decided to move that order to 2023. Now I am seriously thinking of changing the order to a electric high-roof 350 transit. But 120 miles range will NOT work for me.

I searched but cannot find any info on 2023 transit range. Does anyone know if it will be >250 miles? Appreciate any feedback. Thank you.
 

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Thank you! Anything below 200 miles range is scary for me to even think about.
That much range would likely require adding “about” 1,000 pounds of battery, which would reduce payload considerably. Unless Ford find a way to reduce van weight, increase GVWR, and or develop lighter batteries, I would not expect a much longer-range E-Transit.

Cost to add an extra 50 ~ 60 kWh of battery (a rough guess) could also increase e-Transit price by at least $10,000.
 

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nothing yet, but planning on an EV van
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That much range would likely require adding “about” 1,000 pounds of battery, which would reduce payload considerably. Unless Ford find a way to reduce van weight, increase GVWR, and or develop lighter batteries, I would not expect a much longer-range E-Transit.

Cost to add an extra 50 ~ 60 kWh of battery (a rough guess) could also increase e-Transit price by at least $10,000.
the 67kwh battery is around 650-700 lbs so doubling that would put you into the 250-300 mile range so a 200+ mile range would be less than 500 lbs extra. you are correct that if you added batteries post market then they would be at least $10,000 but a 200+ mile range OEM e-transit would likely only be $5000-10000 more because of various variables. ford will need to consider having a larger battery since its competitors will be offering larger battery options
 

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the 67kwh battery is around 650-700 lbs so doubling that would put you into the 250-300 mile range so a 200+ mile range would be less than 500 lbs extra. you are correct that if you added batteries post market then they would be at least $10,000 but a 200+ mile range OEM e-transit would likely only be $5000-10000 more because of various variables. ford will need to consider having a larger battery since its competitors will be offering larger battery options
Your estimates are too optimistic in my opinion.

The high roof Transit is rated by Ford at 108 miles range with 68 kWh battery. To extend range to 200 miles at that rate would require 126 kWh, or additional 58 kWh at least. Because van would weigh more, it likely needs over 60 kWh of additional battery capacity to actually achieve 200 miles of range.

Also, I haven’t seen data suggesting lithium batteries can be installed in a car at a weight of only 10 pounds per kWh. Manufacturers like Chevy rate the battery at ~ 15 pounds per kWh, and total installed weight seems closer to 20 pounds per kWh.

I would be surprised if Ford can deliver a Transit high roof van with 200-mile range without adding very close to 1,000 pounds of total weight; most of that being battery weight.

If you think Ford would charge less than $10,000 to add 58~60 kWh of battery capacity to an E-Transit, take a look at what Ford charge to upgrade an F-150 Lightning from 98 to 131 kWh. It is shocking, though consistent with other manufacturers that offer battery capacity upgrades.
 

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Just happened to see on Ford Media that F-150 Lightning standard model range has been increased to 240 miles, though I don’t see if that’s a revised rating only or if they have made the base model more efficient, or if they have added slight battery capacity.


In any case, the price differential for extended range is between $11,500 and $12,500, which puts cost at well above $300 per kWh. In case of XLT it is approaching $400. Previously it appeared that Ford combined extended range battery with other packages, making it more difficult to separate the cost.

In any case, it seems to me that at that rate it would add in the neighborhood of $20,000 in up front cost to give a Transit 200 miles of range. Ford made a strong case in advertising that most buyers would only need about 70 miles or so if I recall correctly, but I expect they knew that adding $20,000 would kill an E-Transit before it got off the ground.
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