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That's deep snow? It did ok while moving at a good speed, but it almost got stuck in 1" snow when it attempted to take off from a stop.
 

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The first clip was less than impressive, but when I watched it again, I noticed the caption indicated that there was ice beneath the snow.

Need more!
 

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Remember when Kurt got the first delivered 2020 Transit AWD at Matt Ford and had to drive back to Montana, he was on the stock Continental tires and NOTHING in the cargo van other than himself and his luggage. He was impressed how it handled in the ice and snow so you have an indication what someone on the forum thinks about it.
 

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We did a video at our facility, of a 2020 AWD Transit in bean field covered in snow. The AWD transit kept up, no issue. This was with factory tires. I would recommend going to a tire designed for snow use prior to going into a terrain like this but it will take an drive through it. Any questions, feel free to ask.
 

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Remember when Kurt got the first delivered 2020 Transit AWD at Matt Ford and had to drive back to Montana, he was on the stock Continental tires and NOTHING in the cargo van other than himself and his luggage. He was impressed how it handled in the ice and snow so you have an indication what someone on the forum thinks about it.
Yeah, I was pleasantly surprised with the handling empty and with the stock Vanco's. For anyone that has driven in winter in Montana, you know that plowing really isn't a thing on our highways. Even on I-90 on my last day home, there was 2-3 inches of unplowed / partially packed snow, ice, and mixed slush. In my mind, these conditions are worse than deep snow just due to their variability. Over several mountain passes with these conditions, I was happy with how things went. Similar to my Subaru with winter snows. I expect things to be even better with KOs (yes I know not winter tires) and my build out weight in the back.
 

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I think that the important takeaway is that the van did better than it would have with only rear wheel drive. It's likely that the stop/start event would not have gone as well with only one+ wheel power.
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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Typical lightweight content more oriented to engage rather than inform. Could have been written by someone that never drive the vehicle. Not unexpected.
We've made a few videos on the awd system. We're working on many more. If there is something in particular you're all looking for or wondering about, I for one would love to make it.

I've driven a bunch of awd transits in many configurations and many conditions with exception of mud. I can answer most of your questions or I can get the answers. I'm here to answer any and all questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
We've made a few videos on the awd system. We're working on many more. If there is something in particular you're all looking for or wondering about, I for one would love to make it.

I've driven a bunch of awd transits in many configurations and many conditions with exception of mud. I can answer most of your questions or I can get the answers. I'm here to answer any and all questions.
In all fairness I did not look at the date of the article (May 2019) so the author had not driven one in this case and was more "reporting the news" in a conversational way more than providing a first hand account. I am likely over sensitive to words and things like
"All-wheel-drive systems, like those in the Transit, on the other hand, typically engage only when the vehicle’s on-board computer deems it necessary and send torque only to the wheels that need it. "
cause me to understand that this was not a first hand account. "Typically" is what did it in this case.

I've noticed Outside articles on vans and teardrops, etc. I would think it would be interesting to do series documenting taking a AWD transit, 4x4 Sprinter (which is not really German, made in USA now, btw) and a Promaster out in the real world and challenge them a bit to see how they perform in the kinds of situations adventure van owners are likely to encounter.

I have a AWD Transit on order scheduled for build in early Feb. There is a Ford Dealer, a Mercedes Dealer, and a RAM dealer all within walking distance of my home in Grapevine, Texas. I had to make a decision without driving an AWD Transit. I think people would appreciate seeing these vans in action following each other to interesting places like what we plan to do with ours. Our decision to buy and convert a van gew out of a few things but most recently a trip to Moab, UT where we camped on BLM land with a group of mountain bikers, etc. We were off-grid for a week and we pulled a rented teardrop trailer that I set up for solar power as I need a CPAP machine to sleep. The dirt roads out there are sparsely maintained and had there been any rain I don't think our 2015 Toyota Sienna would have been able to make it. We're going back this year in May and plan to have a "phase one" conversion complete by then with a bed and basic electrical. We will feel more confident with a setup that has a high probability of getting us in and out of there. I think many people have that same kind of use case. We only have so much time off and while we don't desire to rock crawl in a van, we would like to be able to stay on schedule and be able to go over passes in the snow and be able to get in and out of camping areas with confidence.

Again, I'm not sure of your affiliation with the piece but I hope that helps.
 

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We did a video at our facility, of a 2020 AWD Transit in bean field covered in snow. The AWD transit kept up, no issue. This was with factory tires. I would recommend going to a tire designed for snow use prior to going into a terrain like this but it will take an drive through it. Any questions, feel free to ask.
This was a pretty good test, especially with the factory tires. I'm not really looking for better performance than that with an AWD van. If I needed more than that, I'd go with a Quigley conversion and a winch. I want better traction on slippery surfaces, and have read multiple accounts of people complaining about getting stuck on wet grass in their RWD Transits. I did chuckle after seeing the twin drag marks in the snow from the rear shock mounts. Good way to measure snow depth. :)
 

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We've made a few videos on the awd system. We're working on many more. If there is something in particular you're all looking for or wondering about, I for one would love to make it.

I've driven a bunch of awd transits in many configurations and many conditions with exception of mud. I can answer most of your questions or I can get the answers. I'm here to answer any and all questions.
what would be nice to see is awd versus rwd lsd same size van and tires,

I would also like to see a test of the different drive modes and list them on the video

i would also like to see the ole roller test with one through three rollers in each terrain mode
 
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