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I didn't know my van could go this fast.

This morning driving back from Spokane area back to the Flathead, on a rural road where the speed limit is 70, With cruise control set at 70, I gradually rolled up behind a 90's generation Nissan sedan that was driving at 65. I timed my closing speed so that when I reached a straight passing area, a very long straight, I put on my turn signal and floored it. When I was 3/4s of the way past the Nissan, the driver of that car sped up and matched my speed. When I hit 80, he still was accelerating next to me. At 90, I could see a car closing from the other direction. I was almost past him, but he wouldn't back off. I kept the van floored and finally, at over 100, I was able to get around the car. This really pissed me off that the (many curse words) driver did this to me. I though about slamming on the brakes and confronting the driver, and several other options, but the driver backed off to below 80 and I was able to get some distance on him. The other kicker was that 10 miles further up the road, I had to slow down to 35 mph behind an old pickup truck that for some reason an old man was just driving very slow. This slowdown caused the "a**hole" to almost catch back up to me, and as he approached he turned his high beams on me.

I have had my van up to around 90 a few times in the past while passing, but never thought I could drive the van over 100.
I was impressed with how stable the van was, and was remembering how poorly my 84 Camaro Z28 handled at 100.

I've made comments on the forum in other threads about people who flip me off as I pass, or other antics they do when I pass, but this one takes the prize.
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I like driving around in my old pickup truck, Grey hair is a license to drive slow.
I live in the country, Along with the city people who wanted that laid back country life but commute to the city every day. They are always in a hurry and I remind them where they are at.
So you are "that guy"?;)
 

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I like driving around in my old pickup truck, Grey hair is a license to drive slow.
I live in the country, Along with the city people who wanted that laid back country life but commute to the city every day. They are always in a hurry and I remind them where they are at.
choices have consequences.
People who choose to live a long drive from where they work need to be aware that comes with consequences.
They probably should have spent more and lived closer to work, or make less and work closer to where they decided to live.
Either way, they gain HOURS per day by not commuting. Just a one hour commute = 10 hours a week, that's a whole extra day of work...or leisure.
Time is something that you cannot get back.

Case in point; a neighbor has a few AA college degrees and experience with a major utility company. After they reduced their local workforce (aka canned him), he got a job at a stainless steel fabricator company literally 1 mile away for a reduced wage. He often rides his bike to work and is there in less than 10 minutes. He's outside doing things with his kids so much that I ask him if work is slow; nope, already done for the day (their hours are like 6-2 or something). It's not his dream job, he could definitely make more money, but the commute to the open positions with the utility company are 1-2 hours drive away depending on traffic. He'd rather spend that time with his kids.

Conversely, there are all these people that deciding buying a house out in Tracy or Livermore, yet they work in San Francisco, was a good idea because they can get a bigger house for less money out there. Sometimes the commute is 3 hours one way due to traffic, but is typically 1-2 hours during rush hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
choices have consequences.
People who choose to live a long drive from where they work need to be aware that comes with consequences.
They probably should have spent more and lived closer to work, or make less and work closer to where they decided to live.
I believe that your statement is incorrect. When I lived and worked in the Bay Area, CA, I really didn't have a "choice" where I could live. I had to live in a location that was "affordable" and fit my budget. I couldn't even come close to being able to afford the rent or to purchase a house near to where I worked. At best, one could call where I lived a "forced choice" I had a 20+ mile commute each way, that by car took over 1 hour each way. I would get up at 4am, leave for work by 5am at the latest, then work from 6 am to about 4:45pm or 6/7pm, after traffic died down. The only thing that saved me was that I did indeed bicycle commute the 21 miles each way, 80% of the time. Breathing in all the wonderful exhaust fumes flowing out of all the stop-and-go vehicles. For over10 years, I endured this lifestyle, sleeping at most 5 hours a night so I could have a little bit of a personal life. (10 to 14 hour work days, often working 6 days a week, dedicated to the bay area high-tech work style.
 

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had a similar experience with a semi, in the rain.
I was passing a rest area or scale and could see trucks entering the freeway.
Changed to the left lane to let them in.
About a half mile past I was nose and nose with a black and orange semi we are both doing about 70 and coming to a hill, so I speed up to get in front, because I prefer to be in the right lane.
Also, on this road, they had signs "left lane passing only".
Not that it was being strictly observed.
But no, the semi kept matching my speed. I swear the guy was putting it in some deliberately awful gear because it was crazy loud as well.
Bear in mid we are still going up hill. After a minute or two more, my lower mass and better power to mass ratio won out and I pulled ahead.
I also had taken off my gas sippers hat and put on my lead foot hat.
So I got back in the right lane. Stabilized to 66 or so, right around 2krpm where it gets decent mileage and put the gas sipper hat back on.
Then a few minutes later the black and orange truck shows up again, making a big show of puling in front of me with maybe 2 feet to spare.
Then he slows down!
So it's rinse and repeat.
I try to pull around and he changes lanes. This goes on for a few minutes until we hit a cluster of cars and trucks and he is not able to move as freely through them as I.
When I puled ahead of them I just stayed in the left lane and kept at 75-80 for the next 15 minutes.
I would add this was at night, I have terrible astigmatism and not great night vision.
And again raining pretty good
Terrifying.
But I guess I learned my lesson about pulling into the left lane to allow trucks to get on the freeway!
 

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I didn't know my van could go this fast.

This morning driving back from Spokane area back to the Flathead, on a rural road where the speed limit is 70, With cruise control set at 70, I gradually rolled up behind a 90's generation Nissan sedan that was driving at 65. I timed my closing speed so that when I reached a straight passing area, a very long straight, I put on my turn signal and floored it. When I was 3/4s of the way past the Nissan, the driver of that car sped up and matched my speed. When I hit 80, he still was accelerating next to me. At 90, I could see a car closing from the other direction. I was almost past him, but he wouldn't back off. I kept the van floored and finally, at over 100, I was able to get around the car. This really pissed me off that the (many curse words) driver did this to me. I though about slamming on the brakes and confronting the driver, and several other options, but the driver backed off to below 80 and I was able to get some distance on him. The other kicker was that 10 miles further up the road, I had to slow down to 35 mph behind an old pickup truck that for some reason an old man was just driving very slow. This slowdown caused the "a**hole" to almost catch back up to me, and as he approached he turned his high beams on me.

I have had my van up to around 90 a few times in the past while passing, but never thought I could drive the van over 100.
I was impressed with how stable the van was, and was remembering how poorly my 84 Camaro Z28 handled at 100.

I've made comments on the forum in other threads about people who flip me off as I pass, or other antics they do when I pass, but this one takes the prize.
Mine seems to be governed at 96 mph. 2015 HR T250 EcoBoost. It is very stable at that speed I am happy to say.
 

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I've known a number of people who hated the fact that they commuted well over an hour a day, but did for one reason. So their kids can be in a better school district.

As for top speed, mine is about 76 mph because that is what the original owner - Budget Rental - had the speed limiter set to. Kinda handy when driving across the Great Plains to just floor it since it has no cruise control. ;)
 

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Yes, people absolutely hate being overtaken by a van. I learned that on day 1. Ironically, since we are camping in it, I never feel the need to rush when I'm driving ours, since in a way, we are already "home" - we just haven't parked it yet. Which is so out of character for how I normally drive lol.
 

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I forgot about "good schools" which actually translates to "safe schools". We were lucky enough to be in El Cerrito's district even though JFK high was 4 blocks away.
Imo; anyone concerned about raising their kids in a better place should ditch the city job and move to a moderate size town and get a lessor paying job there. With cost of living and limited if any commute, it would be a wash financially, if not a BETTER financial situation with the lower paying job and lower housing cost. And the quality of life really has no tangible price tag.

Yes, some jobs are going to have long commutes regardless. Two moonlight rides and a picnic every day; I'd get up at 03:00-04:00 to drive 2 hours to a logging site to be there before the sun came up every day, work until 18:00 or so and then get home by 20:00, eat, and go to bed. Some of the smart guys would just camp at the site during the week and go home on the weekends. But, if you work in a cubicle or at a counter, there's no real reason to drive 2 hours each way when you can do the same thing closer to home, albeit for less money. There's a lot of "middleclass flight" (similar to white-flight but non-racial) taking place right now. People doing exactly what I describe, making less but having much better quality of life. And when you boil it down, isn't making more money all about trying to improve your quality of life? What if you could improve it but make less? Make a spreadsheet of what makes you happy and feel safe; maybe that can be achieved without so much of the daily grind.

My '03 Sprinter had an 80mph governor. It really sucked when you were trying to get around trucks on the highway.
 

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I forgot about "good schools" which actually translates to "safe schools". We were lucky enough to be in El Cerrito's district even though JFK high was 4 blocks away.
Imo; anyone concerned about raising their kids in a better place should ditch the city job and move to a moderate size town and get a lessor paying job there. With cost of living and limited if any commute, it would be a wash financially, if not a BETTER financial situation with the lower paying job and lower housing cost. And the quality of life really has no tangible price tag.

Yes, some jobs are going to have long commutes regardless. Two moonlight rides and a picnic every day; I'd get up at 03:00-04:00 to drive 2 hours to a logging site to be there before the sun came up every day, work until 18:00 or so and then get home by 20:00, eat, and go to bed. Some of the smart guys would just camp at the site during the week and go home on the weekends. But, if you work in a cubicle or at a counter, there's no real reason to drive 2 hours each way when you can do the same thing closer to home, albeit for less money. There's a lot of "middleclass flight" (similar to white-flight but non-racial) taking place right now. People doing exactly what I describe, making less but having much better quality of life. And when you boil it down, isn't making more money all about trying to improve your quality of life? What if you could improve it but make less? Make a spreadsheet of what makes you happy and feel safe; maybe that can be achieved without so much of the daily grind.

My '03 Sprinter had an 80mph governor. It really sucked when you were trying to get around trucks on the highway.
I certainly think some people equate good school with safe school, and all the racial things that infers.
In my sister's family it is a lot more tangible.
My nephew is ADHD and extremely gifted.
I still remember when I pulled my sister aside and told her that her son is grasping and articulating concepts of physics and math as fast as I can throw them at him.
Stuff that people struggle with in college.
They tried to hack it in NYC. But the pubilc school gifted programs are overloaded with kids whose parents had them tutored to make it in.
So the program is effectively hobbled by the slower kids.
For those of you familiar with ADHD, you probably know this is untenable. An ADHD kid stops learning when they have to slow down.
They do best when they can keep going at the speed they are comfortable at.
She tried private schools, but the ones in Brooklyn tend towards a loosely structured environment where each child can fully realize all their little quirks and idiosyncrasies.
Great way to raise a bunch of brats artists.
Due to covid they ended up leaving Brooklyn for the suburbs.
And like you say, it's working out better.
They did okay with the public schools for a while, then found a private gifted school that lets kids work several grades ahead for each subject.
So my neph is doing 9th grade math in 6th and is doing 7th and 8th grade English, History etc.
(he's already one year accelerated.)
The private school isn't cheap, but it's more achievable than anything in NYC. Where all the schools are over-subscribed, and the good ones cost a fortune.

On th plus side I get to tease my sister about going from hip NYC artist to suburban mom!

PS Billie Joe from Green Day's mom used to work at the Emil Villa Hick'ry Pit in EC.
 

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One of our kids is also on the spectrum (aren't we all?), and struggled with school until remote learning, where they thrived, doing all the AP courses and tutoring other students online. The problem schools are that way because of problem students making learning impossible for everyone. The amount of time spent teaching the subject vs classroom management (Shut up! Sit down!) is really low where there are a lot of problem students. For whatever reasons, and there are many, schools with students from higher-income families have fewer selfish problem students; at least as classroom behavior is concerned. The schools in smaller communities also have fewer problem students, or at least they don't act-out as much. Like attracts like, and multiplies when they get together. Thus the whole concept of Fresh Prince of Belair; getting the kid away from bad influences and into a culture where learning is encouraged to the point of just being a given.

Charter schools here are a reaction to the culture in poor-area public schools. The kids went a Jr high charter, and as multi-degreed parents, of course we ended up on the board and got an inside look. The parents, mostly Hispanic, were VERY interested in discipline and removal of distractions and gangish behavior/culture.

PS Green Day was just a Clash copy band that somehow parlayed that into financial success. Two of the three were nice guys, we did a few pre-fame shows with them at the Gilman, still don't know why they were labeled as "punk" because they were always pop, just imitating the Clash earlier on. Creedence Clearwater remains the top local EC band, but Metallica used to rehearse in a garage in EC, not sure if that counts as local or not. None of the projects I helped with did much beyond record deals; I remember the first ASCAP check of 57 cents.
 
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ADHD kids have it easy today, In 1962 they put me in the Iowa state hospital, For a learning disorder. I was 8 years old. The second week I was there I tried to "escape" and I was not allowed to go outside for a whole year. There was a 18 foot tall chainlink fence around the recess yard with no barbwire on top, I climbed it because at that age I loved climbing! They were not thrilled.
Surprisingly it did me a lot of good, When I got out my learning level was two grades ahead of everyone else my age. But then it was back to public school, I managed to keep my grades at about a C average until I graduated high school. I hated public school and I did not see any reason to go beyond that. I have done all right in life but without some sort of college degree it has really held me back in what you are paid.
 

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I just kept my head down. I'm perfectly fine with being remembered as "the weirdo".
This Summer I found out my 1500m school record still stands after 42 years. I also was reminded that only two other classmates completed college (out of 35).
Adaptation Wrinkle Gesture News Photo caption
 
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One of our kids is also on the spectrum (aren't we all?), and struggled with school until remote learning, where they thrived, doing all the AP courses and tutoring other students online. The problem schools are that way because of problem students making learning impossible for everyone. The amount of time spent teaching the subject vs classroom management (Shut up! Sit down!) is really low where there are a lot of problem students. For whatever reasons, and there are many, schools with students from higher-income families have fewer selfish problem students; at least as classroom behavior is concerned. The schools in smaller communities also have fewer problem students, or at least they don't act-out as much. Like attracts like, and multiplies when they get together. Thus the whole concept of Fresh Prince of Belair; getting the kid away from bad influences and into a culture where learning is encouraged to the point of just being a given.

Charter schools here are a reaction to the culture in poor-area public schools. The kids went a Jr high charter, and as multi-degreed parents, of course we ended up on the board and got an inside look. The parents, mostly Hispanic, were VERY interested in discipline and removal of distractions and gangish behavior/culture.

PS Green Day was just a Clash copy band that somehow parlayed that into financial success. Two of the three were nice guys, we did a few pre-fame shows with them at the Gilman, still don't know why they were labeled as "punk" because they were always pop, just imitating the Clash earlier on. Creedence Clearwater remains the top local EC band, but Metallica used to rehearse in a garage in EC, not sure if that counts as local or not. None of the projects I helped with did much beyond record deals; I remember the first ASCAP check of 57 cents.
Yeah my old band played a few shows with Green Day pre-93.
I remember that as the year they blew up because I was on tour with a crappy punk band and we kept pulling in to towns seeing Green Day flyers for the larger venues.
You would see huge blow ups of their faces on record stores etc.
I always thought they sounded like Cheap Trick with out guitar solos.

That was a weird time. My band opened for Chumbawamba at Gilman the year before Tub Thumping.
I was drinking down by the creek with L7 before their gig at Gilman and later that year they were on David Letterman.
Then bands like Steel Pole Bathtub were getting signed to Capitol.
We should have got someone cute in our band so we could get signed.
 
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