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    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      Worth noting that the Lynx stuff is LARGE compared to what it /could/ take to connect stuff. I have a Lynx unit that I didn't install because it would have required more space than I was willing to use. I moved to a terminal fuse block setup and a separate ground block to keep space tight. To be fair, this is after rebuilding the first rig's electrical 3-4 times and building two other vans' electrical and feeling /very/ comfortable about what I'm building and knowing what I will/won't need to mess with much. For the data, the Victron BM or Smart Shunt feed the data to the Cerbo GX with the cool touch-screen... so data is there. I might've pushed harder to find room for the Lynx stuff if it gave me specific per-load info - but that would be a HUGE unit.

      @totalgeek, are you still planning on 4 x 15A Orion units for DC-DC? Just curious... 'cause it's a LOT of real-estate to get 120A of charging. And curious about 12V versus 24V at the inverter/charger as well; especially with 48V solar and (looks like) 24V at the batteries, it seems clear sticking with 24V (or even 48V) to the inverter (and/or batteries) would make more sense?

      Also, I assume you're aware the Color GX is potentially the abandoned step-child at this point- or soon, anyway. Check out the Cerbo or DIY with Venus.
       
    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      First, off... /really/ love the diagrams. I gotta try out that software. I may draw mine just 'cause it looks so cool. I have some very similar stuff: 2020 AWD HR-Ext, dual alternators, dual truck batteries; ~8kWh of storage, Victron gear (Cerbo, MPPT, MultiPlus, Shunt), full-time connected "router" setup, and I'm using the truck charging the house batteries. IOW, silly over-kill stuff as many of our old-timers here will affirm. 馃槒

      I've got a couple feedback items for you and a couple questions below, if you don't mind!

      Hmm, good to know. I could probably fit 6x 100w panels and put them in series-parallel (three strings (in parallel) of two 100w panels in series).

      my one question is from everything I鈥檝e read, solar panels current is what changes with light levels, not voltage. So even in low light conditions, the voltages should still be above 18V?
      Here's an example (from today) of 24V panel voltages (Cerbo GX is pretty sweet.) Left one is the battery voltage and the current being delivered by the panels (to the batteries). Right one is panel (controller input) voltage and current. "12V" panels would be half this.

      So, yes, they start out ~16.5V (even when there's no current generated) and only climb to ~20V tops.

      154833


      I know you've already made up your mind on 12V - and I see the logic of it on the DC storage / house simplicity side (the Victron 24V>12V DC converter is one of my weakest links); but I'd re-think the panel side. The panels are not 12V at any point - they require the MPPT (or PWM) to get them to the right voltage - and it doesn't matter what the input / panel voltage is, it's still 12V on the output side if that's what you want. I'm running 24V for both; but you can run 24V (or 48V) panel setup and still have 12V batteries - and it works better. That 6-gauge is suddenly just fine.

      Also, change from 12V to 24V panels and you get twice the performance for the same cable sizes and the same Victron controller(s). That last part is important: some of the Victron MPPTs are 12/24/48 regardless of the amperage. So... buy the 50A unit you have planned to support ~600W of panels but it supports 2.4kW if you run 48V setup. Or change to the 30A and it supports ~720W at 24V. Easiest would be to just run all 24V panels; but you could do the series-parallel or whatever. And all still 12V on the storage / house side; you'd never see any difference from your planned setup - except it would work better on smaller gauge wire and you could buy a less expensive controller for 100% same performance.

      On the panel setup, I bought 2 additional 50W panels to add to my 4 x 200W panels but ended up just not putting them on. The alternator charging is robust. I'd have been fine with 600W total. (And that might be what I have... I think one of the four panels isn't hooked up and I haven't opened it up to check.) You're welcome to the panels if you want them.

      ----

      I found some CO2 / CO / smoke detectors that looked like they'd work with the Cerbo, but decided against it - I want them to be stand-alone. I also want them isolated from all the other power sources - though I haven't done that yet. I'll see if I can find links to what I'd found, though.

      Water tanks and temp sensors work super well.

      Can you point me to the analog propane sensor you found? I would LOVE to have that in the Cerbo. Using one of those silly Bluetooth app things now - works, but not as awesome as getting notification from the Cerbo.

      ----

      Looking at the fuse plans, I changed to this Blue Sea fuse block to save space. Only goes up to a 250A max, but useful with a lot of stuff versus external ANLs. Just more compact - used it in place of a positive bus-bar and fuses.

      On the "Master Switch", I think the Blue Sea switches are 300A max. You might hit / exceed that (at 12V) depending on the inverter / charger / AC unit. Might need a separate master per battery?

      (I know you know... but this is why 24V when doing large current.)

      ----

      On the Sterlings, it looks like you're aware (and others have hinted) that you are unlikely to run two of those at full pull on the 175A fused CCP2. You could move to FPGA but I'm not sure that would even do it - can't recall limit but it's close.
       
    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      Discussion Starter · #150 ·
      Fuse block? Hm. I have this one as our 24VDC bar. And this fuse block was the old one we used (sitting in my garage - free if you want it). It has been replaced with this smaller fuse block (chosen for size and layout plus the lighted "bad fuse" function) and this relay / fuse block (chosen to get the relay switch setup and nice to have lighted "bad fuse" functions and a good layout).

      Here's how that 12VDC setup looked previously:


      and here's how it looks now:


      and here's how it actually looks with the panel on it. ;)
       
    2. Registered
      2022 T350HD #11000 Avalanche Gray
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      901 Posts
      Fuse block? Hm. I have this one as our 24VDC bar. And this fuse block was the old one we used (sitting in my garage - free if you want it). It has been replaced with this smaller fuse block (chosen for size and layout plus the lighted "bad fuse" function) and this relay / fuse block (chosen to get the relay switch setup and nice to have lighted "bad fuse" functions and a good layout).

      Here's how that 12VDC setup looked previously:
      View attachment 166374

      and here's how it looks now:
      View attachment 166375

      and here's how it actually looks with the panel on it. ;)
      View attachment 166376
      I see heat pads for water and batteries. Which pads are you using? I know they do not cost much and have thought about adding them to my build.
       
    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      That could work, @Brodo22. I used this one but it's just a question of space usage and simplicity - versus separate fuses or breakers. Whatever suits. I use that unit for three large loads (including the 12V loads) as wiring / fault protection. Similar to one of those small-load fuse-blocks, basically.

      The breaker reference is for the battery isolation. It is right-and-proper to separate the switch and fuse (typically ANL) but again, there's the space thing and if 200A breaker can take the place of the 250A "terminal fuse" (in the diagram) and the "bat switch" I like the simplicity of it.

      I can't recall if it's addressed in all the above, but if you have two batteries, co-terminating equal length cables from positive to fuse (or breaker) and the other two to shunt is a clean and simple way to do it. Battery A positive >> Fuse/breaker; Battery B positive >> fuse/breaker. Battery A negative >> shunt; battery B negative >> shunt.
       
    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      ... l purchased the system from Battleborn but they weren't much help with anything technical just good for selling parts.
      ...
      I've heard that before.


      ... I am definitely not sure about the grounding on the emergency brake mount or the solar panels being series or parallel ...
      Nice work on the drawing. Very clear.

      Agreed with others: isolators are a no-go for LFP batteries. Get a DC-DC unit (like Kisae or Sterling or even Victro) or do DC-AC-DC (less expensive for more power since you already have a Multiplus - pick your favorite affordable inverter and get up to 120A charging out of it).

      On that line, if you can return the smart dongle for the MP, do so and get a CerboGX instead. Or just run a Raspberry Pi. Both are a better, more useful control of the Mutiplus and MPPT (from cell phone or other device). Also ideally get a Victron Smart Shunt (or BMV-70) to coordinate control of Multiplus and MPPT at the battery (not required, but works well together versus coordinating MPPT and MP).

      For those large fuses, might consider swapping the positive bus for a fused bar. There are others; but they combine a fuse into a small space - kinda nice.

      If those panels are 24V, even better - that MPPT is ready for them at 48V. Run them series either way - yeah, not as good when shaded, but better the rest of the time on small gauge wire.

      And pick a different ground. The brake lever isn't the place. Either an "approved" ground or a d-ring bolt.
       
    2. Registered
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      Discussion Starter · #10 ·
      I've heard that before.




      Nice work on the drawing. Very clear.

      Agreed with others: isolators are a no-go for LFP batteries. Get a DC-DC unit (like Kisae or Sterling or even Victro) or do DC-AC-DC (less expensive for more power since you already have a Multiplus - pick your favorite affordable inverter and get up to 120A charging out of it).

      On that line, if you can return the smart dongle for the MP, do so and get a CerboGX instead. Or just run a Raspberry Pi. Both are a better, more useful control of the Mutiplus and MPPT (from cell phone or other device). Also ideally get a Victron Smart Shunt (or BMV-70) to coordinate control of Multiplus and MPPT at the battery (not required, but works well together versus coordinating MPPT and MP).

      For those large fuses, might consider swapping the positive bus for a fused bar. There are others; but they combine a fuse into a small space - kinda nice.

      If those panels are 24V, even better - that MPPT is ready for them at 48V. Run them series either way - yeah, not as good when shaded, but better the rest of the time on small gauge wire.

      And pick a different ground. The brake lever isn't the place. Either an "approved" ground or a d-ring bolt.
      Thank you so much for your excellent advice I will make the changes that you have recommended. I will be looking for a good quality B to B and change out the smart dongle, also move the Grounding to a recommended place. Thanks for looking at my drawing and pointing me in the right direction, I appreciate it very much. Thanks again. Jerry
       
    1. Registered
      2020 High-Extended AWD EcoBoost Cargo with windows
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      Great work on that diagram. Agreed with @kenryan: swap the switch and 150A breaker for a 200A breaker. 150A is too small for 2/0 according to the charts / calcs I've seen; and that breaker is rated for use as a switch.

      I'd recommend a fused busbar for that main 24V: then use an appropriate fuse for each point. I used this one; but there are probably alternatives. Mostly, that gives you a fuse for that line to the big inverter.

      FWIW, some folks like to use breakers for the 120VAC circuits as well; I did the same as you... just GFCIs. And mine are both off AC1 - nothing on AC2 for our usage.

      Final item: I can't find the reference at the moment... but I'm pretty sure there's a reason to have a shut-off on both legs of the solar. Maybe someone will kick in on the "why" since I can't remember right now.

      What software did you use for the diagram? It's very well done.
       
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