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    1. · Registered
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      That should be plenty. You might consider going the moto ramp or Ikea bed slat route for lighter weight and to make it easier to remove. Most of the outfitters use a three panel configuration with each end resting on 1 1/2" angle iron rails. I did the same with a $100 three panel aluminum atv ramp from Harbor freight. I just drilled out the hinges and cut each one to length, glued and screwed 1/4 ply ( I'd probably use 1/2" if I did it again) and covered them in indoor/outdoor carpet. Each panel weighs 15lbs and the original ramp was rated at 1500 lbs, so they are ridiculously strong. You could set something like that right on the top edge of your 2x6 ledgers that you have on the wall. In my van, the panels fit very snugly in the rails and I've never had any problem with flexing or squeaking. To secure them when I'm driving, I run a long tie down strap over the end of the whole bed and down through a couple of the D-rings.

      Harbor Freight ramps:

      http://www.harborfreight.com/super-wide-tri-fold-loading-ramp-90018.html

      My three panel bed:

      http://www.fordtransitusaforum.com/...other-minimalist-conversion-4.html#post140802

      JP
       
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      Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
      Captain, Beautiful workmanship and love the writeup! What did you use for the bed frame (extrusion, other, thickness)?

      I bought the bed frame as aluminum ATV ramps from harbor freight (frequently coupons on their site for these, I got them for $78): https://www.harborfreight.com/super-wide-tri-fold-loading-ramp-90018.html



      Drilled out the rivets, and removed the steel tailgate hooks at the end. I then mounted the 3 individual sections on 2x4 frames that are fastened to the wall with rivnuts and have legs that go to the floor and top of the wheel well for added support (and to have a place to easily mount to in the storage area). The aluminum ramps are 69 inches long, so I doubled up the 2x4 at each end to make a wider shelf for the ramps to span across. The aluminum runners were backed with foam tape where they meet the wood and then I put four #10 screws with washers to attach each ramp to the wood. Easy to put in and really easy to remove if I ever need to take them out. I left a 5 inch gap between each ramp section to accommodate the width of 54" full size bed.



      The bed is really sturdy, and is only ~30lbs. This was not my idea, I came across a few other people on this forum who used the ATV ramps in different ways with success. I am really glad I went this route. This was much cheaper than going with 80/20 if you not already set up to cut and connect extruded aluminum, and a fraction of the weight and space needed for wood construction.
       
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      You're ahead of me build wise as my van is still on order but one strategy I plan to research more is to buy one of these harbor freight loading ramps, split it into three sections by removing the hinges, and then spacing each of the resulting 15" wide ladder frames with 1/2" birch ply over top to create a ~60" wide queen bed. They would likely need to get cut down a bit lengthwise and then supported with aluminum angle or channel ledgers fastened to the walls of the van.

       
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      You're ahead of me build wise as my van is still on order but one strategy I plan to research more is to buy one of these harbor freight loading ramps, split it into three sections by removing the hinges, and then spacing each of the resulting 15" wide ladder frames with 1/2" birch ply over top to create a ~60" wide queen bed. They would likely need to get cut down a bit lengthwise and then supported with aluminum angle or channel ledgers fastened to the walls of the van.

      Wow. Price has gone up. I paid $79 each for the 2 I purchased 1.5 years ago. (After a 20% off coupon.) I left one up at the cabin, and the other I started using as a ramp, and never got around to using it as a bed frame.
       
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      What are those cross pieces and where did you get them. They don't look like the IKEA cross pieces. What are they called so I can google them.
      It looks like Boondox is using Harbor Freight loading ramps. They are a popular alternative to the Ikea Skorva bed rails. It all depends on how you want to construct the bed, and availability of materials.
      Harbor Freight loading Ramps

      My Transit bed uses the Ikea Skorva bed rails attached to 2" wide x 1/8" thick aluminum that are lowered using an additional 6" wide piece of aluminum so the top of the mattress is below the bottom of the rear windows. If you want the mattress higher for more storage under the bed, just attach the 2" aluminum directly to Ford's mounting holes. Plus Nuts and hurricane bolts secure the aluminum pieces to the van. The Ikea rails are screwed into the aluminum to secure them in the moving Transit. Plywood is then screwed to the Ikea bed rails to support the mattress. It has worked great for over 32,000 miles.

       
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      2021 HR 148” Long AWD 350
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      We started crew for airbags and DOT approved seating. It’s a 2021 AWD 148” Long. The build will be a bike hauler that sleeps and seats 4 x (<6’) adult-sized people. We’re seasoned car/backpack campers — the goal wasn’t spacious, it was a secure/obscured place to stow bikes and a comfortable place for the family to sleep, get in out of the elements.

      We’re using the Flat Line Van Co bed over a garage containing 4 bikes. There are many great DIY options for far cheaper, but for off the shelf — it’s attractive, fast to install, and secure. (We’re also using their rack, ladder, and bike trays.)


      Second bed is in prototype stage. Teens spent 2 nights sleeping comfortably, so we’re ready to build something more elegant. Both front seats swivel. When they are swiveled and slid back to the dashboard, the span is 50”x(60-70”).
      Our prototype was a folding platform of 2x2s covered with a sheet of 1/4” plywood, each panel 29x45. For the test run, the platform was supported with the cooler + buckets we filled with gear for the trip. Kids slept on their backpacking pads. It’s bigger than our backpacking tents. A learning is if the platform + mattress can get 8” above the seats, the sleepers have 70” to fully extend with heads/feet overhanging armrests.


      In the more elegant build, we’ll likely use this folding moto-ramp for the platform, trimmed to length. 1/4in plywood slats + a folding mattress. Legs/Base I’m thinking of building easy to throw together/take apart/stow press-fit boxes using framing from McMaster-Carr.

      There are inflatable cab beds, but my requirement for the kid bed is it needs to be quick to set-up/take-down because we’ve got places to go :). All of what I’ve described above stows on top of the permanent bed, secured with 700lb ratchet straps.
       
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