Does engine rpm result in early failure? - Ford Transit USA Forum
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-16-2019, 10:43:PM Thread Starter
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Does engine rpm result in early failure?

So after reading about the driveshaft, torque converter problems and other mechanical issues, I've concluded that to get the most out of my van I should avoid doing things like accelerating past 3500 rpm, and just operate it smoothly (medium pressure on brakes, steady climbing on hills, etc).

My specific question though:
Is it dumb to drive my van under 3500 rpm for the next x00000 miles?

I assume it would help but when I worked at a dealership I remember a master tech telling me that a bmw would develop huge carbon build up because the owner didnt give it a decent sprint at least once a week.
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-16-2019, 10:45:PM
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Low rpms impose the most load on the engine. Drive smoothly and gently like all your suggestions but don't worry about high rpms.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-16-2019, 11:44:PM
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The torque converter and drive shaft issues are design flaws. Decreasing engine RPM is not going to mitigate those issues.

BMW had some major design flaws that allowed lots of carbon buildup on the intake valves of their direct injection engines. Not as big of a problem on the 3.5l ecoboost. The 3.7l is not a direct injection so no problem at all.

I agree with Eiko, be gentle anyway but don't worry about some high RPMs.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 01:31:AM Thread Starter
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Perfect answers guys, thanks! Its a 2018 3.7 so hopefully I can have any failures happen while the 5 year warranty is still valid rather than after. Otherwise it'll be another business expense 🙄
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 09:57:AM
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low rpm's under heavy loads also heats up the trans fluid more as it's pumping slower through the trans cooler. If you're going up a hill loaded, drop it down a gear and let the rpm's come up, it's less stress on everything.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 10:36:AM
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Originally Posted by gtluke View Post
low rpm's under heavy loads also heats up the trans fluid more as it's pumping slower through the trans cooler. If you're going up a hill loaded, drop it down a gear and let the rpm's come up, it's less stress on everything.
Same goes for engine coolant.

Also think about downhill under load. A little bit of engine braking from a downshift keeps the brakes cooler and ready to do a better job when needed. Too many folks ride the brakes down steep grades and sometimes discover there's not much left if they need to actually stop or slow suddenly.

Other than downshifting for momentary climbs and steep descents under load, just let the transmission do its thing in matching RPM to the speed, load and demand. It's like any other car or other vehicle - if you thrash it, you'll shorten its useful life and waste fuel, if you drive sanely, the RPMs will take care of themselves.

It's not like a manual transmission where it's up to you to manage the shift points. In that case, too low can lug the engine which in some engine designs will scuff the piston against the cylinder walls. Automatic transmissions and modern engine controls will not let that happen. Conversely, shift points too high (...my wife's m.o. with our M/T cars...) generates unnecessary wear and tear on moving parts. I do nearly all of the driving, thank goodness, and get 200K+ out of clutches for a reason.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 06:47:PM
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"Piston travel per mile". Used to be reported in major car mags, 1960s. VW Bug always won.
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